29 March, 2010

Fabric with Weight

Progress on a quilt! Trust me, this is momentous news lately. Hubby has been out of town a lot, I've had some writing deadlines, and Quilt Canada is now a month away.  Things are busy! But we had a low key weekend and I squeezed in some sewing, during naptime of course.

This is the start of what is currently being referred to as my Slaveship Quilt. I promise I will get a better name in time. These strips have come from this pile of indigo fabrics. Oh, I heart these indigo fabrics. These are designs that are well over a century old, but some of them are so bold and modern today. And that indigo is melting my heart.

It wasn't until I started cutting into them that I realized these were real Da Gama fabrics, imported from South Africa. Suddenly the fabric had more weight, and the project took on even more symbolism for me.

Yes folks, I would say that I am making my first art quilt. With every step, from inspiration to design to sewing I feel the importance of each decision. There is a reason to everything I'm doing. So not only do I intend to have something beautiful simply to look at, I hope it is something meaningful and symbolic too.

(My nature is to suddenly retreat into something self-deprecating right now, but this project doesn't deserve that.)

This is a multi-step design and who knows whether I'll finish it this week or next year, but I hope you will enjoy the process as much as I will.

11 comments:

Kris said...

I love the indigo tones too! It's good to see you able to sew again and I'm excited to watch the process.

elle said...

I just hung my white damask cotton curtains up in the bedroom. The wind is billowing them out. Then I saw your indigo and white piecing. SNIFF! Everything is so fresh and springy today. A great start to the week. This is gonna be good, Cheryl!

CitricSugar said...

I am positive that you will have a great experience with this quilt - the fabrics are gorgeous and, even though you have that Canuck imperative to humble yourself, I have no doubt that it will be beautiful.

I wish you good luck and good process!

beth said...

the fabric is lovely. You'll have a great time working with it and whatever you make will be beautiful. Enjoy the process!

Islay said...

Beautiful indigo fabric, and how lovely to begin to feel the history of the designs and fabrics you're using. I'm sure it will be amazing when it's done (and if it takes a whlie, you get to admire that wonderful fabric even longer!).

r0ssie said...

I can't wait to see the quilt!

sulu-design said...

I'm glad you silenced those self-deprecating thoughts. This sounds like it's going to be one special piece. It's great to hear how invested you are in it.

KatieQ said...

Thank you for posting the link to Da Gama fabrics. I was not familiar with them before. This project is obviously beyond the beauty of the indigo fabrics. I'm happy that you have a project you feel such a strong connection to. I've been searching for a project that will connect the work of my hands to the things I hold to be true or just. I feel like the things I work on are just passing time until I'm ready for the emotional connection.
I visited the Quilt Canada site. It looks like a fabulous show. I was planning to visit the Sewing Expo in Worcester MA this month, but the class offerings are not nearly as riveting as those in the Quilt Canada brochure. I've already warned my husband that we may be making the trip up north next year.

whatktmadenext said...

Wow, those fabrics are amazing. The designs are really 100 years old? That's incredible - I would have used them in a "modern" quilt in heartbeat.

Good luck for your journey. It sounds like the journey is definitely going to be as important as the destination.

anne said...

Enjoy the journey, may the quilt bring you peace,joy,experience and a general feeling of wellbeing. Look forward to seeing more. Carpe diem(latin for........). Google and see.

patty a. said...

What beautiful fabrics! I love blue and white fabric. I just bought a bunch of b&w batiks. I can't wait to see out your quilt turns out.