30 January, 2013

Quick Question

If you are taking a class on technique, would you rather have the teacher run through multiple ways of doing the same thing or focus on the way he/she thinks works best?


37 comments:

Natasha said...

Never having taken a class, I think I would like the focus to be on the way the teacher thinks works best but with some quick demos as to at least one other way.

CarlyMaria said...

I agree with Natasha, I've never taken a class, but I also think it would be helpful to focus on what the teacher thinks is the best way.

Colleen said...

Teach me your way. That is why I am in the class. But monitor your students. Everyone has different learning styles so if you see someone struggling teach a different way. You dont want to overwhelm with too much info.

pinkbrain said...

Teach the one method that works best for you. If there's another way of doing it that's very different maybe include that technique as well (e.g. Hand stitched binding vs machine stitching).

tracy_a said...

Would you use one rather than another for a slightly different result/situation? If you are only going to teach one technique - I would make that clear in the class description. I would also hope the teacher would be familiar enough to be able to execute other techniques, give advice if someone learned another way, and talk about why they like the one that they like. It depends on time and the level of the class - if you have a short amount of time and it takes that long to learn your technique, just list others/give references.

Quilty Conscience said...

Having quilted for years, but still occasionally taking a class, I want to be exposed to many techniques. New things happen and I don't want to miss any of them. We tend to do things "the way we've always done them" but I want to be challenged to try something new. Toni

TheaM said...

my own experience after decades of teaching beginning quilters... is that they get confused when shown more than one way of doing something. I try to simplify for them by teaching the easiest way.
More advanced quilters benefit from multiple options of the same technique, but too many at once can still cause confusion.

~Michelle~ said...

Maybe teach it the way you like, but then offer up the chance to show different techniques one-on-one to those who are interested. What may work best for you may not work best for others, so I would at least let them know there are alternatives.

Suzanne said...

I want a quick overview of the options but then I want in depth instruction on your way.

Deb said...

I agree with Suzanne, show me your way in depth, but give me a quick overview of the options.

Katie B said...

The one you think works best!

Leanne said...

These are such interesting comments. I have not taken many classes either. However, when I learn I search the internet for as many different ways to do something and then I try more than one way and can pick my favourite, which I sometimes adapt into a somewhat different approach yet or sometimes I combine the best parts of more than one method. I would want to learn which way you prefer to do things but I would also want to learn options and different approaches. I don't think that is confusing and I don't seek oversimplified instructions, but maybe it is different for some students.

Jess said...

I'd say multiple, because then I have the option of picking what I like and what works best for me, which may not be the same as what works best for you.

Erin Quinn said...

I'd say start with one technique and then then walk around. If you're finding everyone can do that easy peasy or are really struggling show an alternative or give extra tips. I think that if you start all at once with many many many options it can be a bit overwhelming and people end up muddled up. But we do like to stretch ourselves, so I think you just have to start simple and then monitor your class.
E

Nancy said...

I will be teaching a technique class soon and I am going to focus on what works best for me...but will share other ways in which the technique can be approached with different materials etc...

Good luck with your class!
Nancy W.

stitchinpenny said...

Teach me what you do best, but mention the alternatives in case I want to look into them.. If I am taking your class I like your quilts.

Maja said...

When I teach I show the way I like the most, but three is always someone that asks if there's another way to do the same thing.
It's important that everybody feels secure and find the way that feels right for them and that they have fun!

Julierose said...

I have never taken a class either,,,but I feel that I would want to know the teacher's methods--that would be why I would take the class....like how Jo Diggs does her landscapes for instance....just one gal's opinion...Julierose

CitricSugar said...

I personally like some options. However, some learners get really intimidated and confused by that and would rather have "the" way you do it and master that before adding variations; even then most of those students will probably only do it the way you show them first. If you can swing it, you can try to put a little wiggle room in your class plan so that you can gauge what kind of students you have before committing one way or the other.

Jody said...

Focus on what she thinks works best:)

giddy99 said...

Teach the one you know/prefer, but at least touch on the other methods. I recently took a class to improve paper piecing skills, and the instructor's preferred method was less efficient and more awkward than the one I already knew (a little disappointing).

Arita said...

Focus on what works best.

Andrea said...

The technique that the teacher specializes in....

sulu-design said...

I want to know why you like to do things the way you do, but I'd want to be exposed to the other methods and know their benefits, too. I was taught to do that when I was trained to be a teacher. Since we all do things differently, I think it's best to expose people in a class to multiple options (unless, of course, the class is "sold" as a course on how to perform a specific skill in a specific way, so that it's clear from the get go).

Angel said...

Multiple ways, definitely, because different people work different ways. Perhaps, start by teaching what you think works best, and teach alternatives if anyone in the class has difficulty?

JaneB said...

Focus would be better for how I learn.

Jennadesigns said...

I think the person teaching the class should emphasize what technique works for them and spend the majority of his or her time there. That being said, not every technique works for every person, and rather than ending up with a few discouraged participants, it would be kind to touch on a couple of different techniques as well, although that certainly doesn't need to be the focus.

Tabatha said...

I would want to know the most efficient, accurate way of doing something, not necessarily the fastest however, learning alternate ways is also beneficial.
~ Tabatha at BendingPins.com ~

astitch said...

Tutors way as it will work, but to be advised about other techniques to also try if wanted.

Sowing Stitches said...

Everyone learns differently...a variety of methods will be best to make sure all learning styles are met. A bit time consuming but that is the life of an educator.

Within A Quarter Inch said...

focus grasshopper

Fran said...

I would prefer the multiple techniques, particularly if one of them is a shortcut!

Elsa said...

While I'd like all the options, a focus on one would be the best thing. Some times too much information is just too much information.

Michelle in NH said...

Kind of both. I think I benefit from looking at all the options, but then focusing on one--in this case, the teacher's choice. (I'm thinking of the multiple ways to sew Flying Geese. While I have now chosen my prefered way, I would have gladly gone to a class teaching one of the others especially if all ways were presented.)

Esch House Quilts said...

I like to know the teacher's way but a few comments on what might not work for you about some of the other common methods is helpful too.

Susan K from Canada said...

I would like to have several techniques presented as long as that was specified in the course outline - good to learn several approaches

Sharon said...

I guess I would prefer you just show it your way and mention that there are many ways to get to achieve the same outcome.